Faculty Directory

Deborah Fidler

Deborah J. Fidler, PhD

Professor and Assistant Department Head of Human Development and Family Studies

Contact Information

313 Behavioral Sciences Building
1570 Campus Delivery
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO 80523-1570

Phone: 970-491-7870
Fax: 970-491-7975
E-mail: deborah.fidler@colostate.edu

Website

Developmental Disabilities Research Laboratory

Research Interests

My research agenda involves a multi-disciplinary approach to studying development in children with neurogenetic disorders. Neurogenetic disorders predispose individuals not simply to cognitive delays, but to a range of other developmental outcomes as well, resulting in distinct behavioral phenotypes. My research interests involve describing the phenotypic effects of specific genetic disorders on development, and how behavioral phenotypes indirectly predispose children to certain parent responses, family outcomes, and educational needs. I study development in neurogenetic disorders as a dynamic process, through both cross-sectional and longitudinal study designs.

A main component of my research agenda concerns characterizing the cognitive-linguistic profiles associated with different neurogenetic syndromes. My most recent work in this area has been focused on the development of executive function and goal-directed behavior in children with Down syndrome. Our team (Fidler & Daunhauer) currently has funding from the National Institute of Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research for an intervention study that aims to foster the development of goal-directed behavior in infants with Down syndrome.

Education

B.A., 1996, Psychology, Cornell University
M.S., 1998, Psychological Studies in Education, University of California, Los Angeles
Ph.D., 2001, Psychological Studies in Education, University of California, Los Angeles

Honors and Awards

2014-present - Editor, American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

2014-present - Co-Editor, International Review of Research on Developmental Disabilities

2013 - College of Health and Human Sciences Scholarly Excellence Award

2009 - Waterpik Award for Excellence in Education, CSU Athletics Dept

2007 - Mentoring Pair Award Recipient with Amy Philofsky, PhD, ASHA

2006 - College of Health and Human Sciences Tenure Track Scholar Award

2001 - Charles J. Epstein Down Syndrome Research Award (NDSS)

2001 - Prentke-Romich AAMR Communication Disorders Research Award

Current Research Projects

Fidler, D.J. (PI) & Daunhauer, L. (PI). 2015-2018. US Dept of Health and Human Services/Adminstration for Community Living/National Institute of Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research. Title: An Intervention to Promote Goal-Directed Behavior in Infants with Down Syndrome.

Fidler, D.J. (PI) & Riley, K. (PI). Global Down Syndrome Foundation. 2015-2017. Title: Adult Educational Programming: An exploration of courses designed to meet the unique needs of individuals with Down syndrome.

Professional Experience

2012-present: Professor of Human Development and Family Studies with Tenure (Graduate Faculty), Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University

2006-2012: Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies with Tenure (Graduate Faculty), Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University.

2001-2006: Assistant Professor of Human Development and Family Studies (Graduate Faculty), Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University.

Selected Publications

Lee, N.R., Anand, P., Will, E., Adeyemi, E.I., Clasen, L.S., Giedd, J.N., Daunhauer, L., Fidler, D.J., & Edgin, J. (in press). Everyday executive function difficulties in youth with Down syndrome: Evidence of age-related stability as well as a profile of overlapping and unique features relative to youth with X-chromosome aneuploidy. Frontiers in Neuroscience.

Will, E., Fidler, D.J., & Daunhauer, L. (2014). Early executive function and planning in children with Down syndrome. International Review of Research in Developmental Disabilities, 49, 77-99.

Fidler, D.J., Will, E., Daunhauer, L.A., Gerlach-McDonald, B., & Visootsak, J. (2014). Object-related generativity in children with Down syndrome. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 35, 3379-3385.

Daunhauer, L.A., Fidler, D.J., Hahn, L., Will, E., Lee, N.R., & Hepburn, S. (2014). Profiles of everyday executive functioning in young children with Down syndrome. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 119, 303-318.

Daunhauer, L.A., Fidler, D.J., & Will, E. (2014). School function in students with Down syndrome. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68, 167.

Fidler, D.J., Lunkenheimer, E.S. & Hahn, L. (2011). Emerging behavioral phenotypes and dynamic systems theory. International Review of Research in Developmental Disabilities, 40, 17-42.

Lee, N.R., Fidler, D.J., Blakeley-Smith, A., Daunhauer, L., Robinson, C., & Hepburn, S. (2011). Caregiver-report of executive functioning in a population-based sample of young children with Down syndrome. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 116, 290-304.

Fidler, D.J., Most, D.E., Booth-LaForce, C. & Kelly, J. (2008). Emerging social strengths in young children with Down syndrome at 12 and 30 months. Infants and Young Children, 21, 207-220.

Fidler, D.J. & Nadel, L. (2007). Educating children with Down syndrome: Neuroscience, development, and intervention. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews, 13ΒΈ262-277.

Fidler, D.J., Hepburn, S.L., Most, D.E., Philofsky, A., & Rogers, S. (2007). Emotional responsivity in young children with Williams syndrome. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 112, 194-206.

Fidler, D.J., Most, D.E., & Guiberson, M.M. (2005). Neuropsychological correlates of word identification in Down syndrome. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 26, 487-501.

Fidler, D.J., Philofsky, A., Hepburn, S., & Rogers, S. (2005). Nonverbal requesting and problem solving in toddlers with Down syndrome. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 110, 312-322.

Fidler, D.J. (2005). The emerging Down syndrome behavioral phenotype in early childhood: Implications for practice. Infants and Young Children, 18, 86-103.

Fidler, D.J., Hepburn, S., Mankin, G., & Rogers, S. (2005). Praxis skills in young children with Down syndrome, other developmental disabilities, and typically developing children. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 59, 129-138.

Fidler, D.J., Hodapp, R.M. & Dykens, E.M. (2002). Behavioral phenotypes and special education: Parent report of educational issues for children with Down syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, and Williams syndrome. Journal of Special Education, 36, 80-88.

Thematic Research Areas

  • Risk, Resilience, & Developmental Psychopathology
  • Treatment, Intervention, & Prevention Science